Tag: prophecy


books & culture review of MAKING MANIFEST

8th November

yesterday, CT’s site ran a fine review of MAKING MANIFEST, which was released digitally this week in a revised edition. check out the review here and tell everyone you know about it!

 



horror & the holy, part 2

23rd July

In my last article, we began discussing the engagement of Christian art with the horror genre. Horror, I argued, fundamentally functions by a theme of “transgression” which can be employed for faith-minded purposes – not only does horror attack that which is lovely, but it also affirms that there is something lovely to be attacked in the first place.

However, the purpose of Christian living is to “glorify God and enjoy Him forever” – a horror story may affirm His law, but how can it affirm the Creator Himself?

This moves us towards the relationship between the holy and the obscene. Most horror stories clearly get their momentum from the latter, but horror can also serve to make us mindful of the sacred. In The Problem of Pain (1940), C. S. Lewis sets up a fascinating striation of just how humans experience the … Read More »



making manifest round-up #3

14th July

in case you’ve missed the buzz, here’s just a few things being said about “making manifest: on faith, creativity, and the kingdom at hand” (if you haven’t gotten your copy yet, order it today!)

 

reviews…

super positive endorsement from englewood review of books!

 

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posts by bloggers… (and what’s lovely about these posts are that both “writer” and “non-writer” types are using the book!)

kerri baysinger

renee emerson

johnny douglas

kathleen kruger

 

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interviews with harrity…

w/ messiah community and michael lorin (an episcopalian revisiting evangelical roots… ;-) )

 

 

 



creativity and peacemaking: poetry drone

25th June

i believe this world is a complicated place, that i’m nearly void of answers, and that—as thomas merton says in his famous prayer— “i have no idea where i am going.” (that prayer embodies most every day of my life…). as such, i tend not to speak publicly about issues of which i’m passionate—i’m never quite sure of my motivation, correctness, or even how i might feel about it later. rather than risk embarrassment, i say nothing. or—almost always—say it discretely in my daily writing. writing which no one sees but me. but here, i’d like to take a little stand for something i think has provocative implications for christian creatives. and—as i love such things—it demonstrates the world’s complexity. this project speaks to my deeply held beliefs about creating: the opposite of making art is doing violence.* or, to say it … Read More »



The Loosened Tongue: Naught but Silence Can Express

12th March

In an earlier essay, featured here on Antler, I attempted to establish the legitimacy and shape of a modern poetic-prophetic ministry. One of the claims of that piece was that a prophet does not choose their call to speak, but are themselves chosen by the Other. True as that may be it doesn’t follow that individuals can’t makes themselves more open to just such a call—or to any other form of Spirit-led service for that matter—and prepare themselves to carry it out. One of the most fundamental of these methods is the use of silent waiting.

While periods of silence may have some physiological and emotional benefits in and of themselves that isn’t our concern here. We are interested in silence as a tool—a method by which an individual may wait on the Lord, and through which the Word may come … Read More »



On Robert Herrick

9th February

{Poet, Paul Willis reflects on To Blossoms by Robert Herrick}

To Blossoms

Fair pledges of a fruitful tree,
Why do ye fall so fast?
Your date is not so past
But you may stay yet here a while,
To blush and gently smile,
And go at last.

What, were ye born to be
An hour or half’s delight,
And so to bid good-night?
‘Twas pity nature brought ye forth
Merely to show your worth,
And lose you quite.

But you are lovely leaves, where we
May read how soon things have
Their end, though ne’er so brave;
And after they have shown their pride,
Like you a while, they glide
Into the grave.

—Robert Herrick (1591-1674)

 

Robert Herrick may not be as spiritually sincere a poet as George Herbert, but he awakens me to the beauty and pathos of nature as few other writers do.  For the wistful spirit of carpe diem, he is unsurpassable.  “To Blossoms” is one of his many … Read More »



basic math: on creativity and opening the kingdom

28th November

{in this snippet of his forthcoming book “making manifest”–available april 2013–teacher, author, and poet dave harrity asks some questions that invite believers to think about what they’re adding to the world, and the creative implications of faith. if you’re in or near louisville on thursday november 29, you can catch him speaking on a panel about thomas merton and millennial faith practice at st. matthew’s episcopal church (330 North Hubbards Lane) at 7pm…}

 

And Mary said:

“My soul glorifies the Lord 

    and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, 

 for he has been mindful

    of the humble state of his servant. 

From now on all generations will call me blessed, 

     for the Mighty One has done great things for me—

    holy is his name. 

His mercy extends to those who fear him,

    from generation to generation. 

He has performed mighty deeds with his arm; 

    he has scattered those who are proud in their … Read More »



Use What Yo Daddy Gave You: On Poetry in Church {Awaken Series}

6th September

{one of Antler’s goals is to foster discussion about poetry in religious life–offering content for faith communities to discuss, share, and contemplate. in that vein, we also give careful consideration to ministers who are thinking about using poetry and creative writing as a tool for spiritual formation. to that end, we’re going to be hearing from ministers and members of congregations as part of our “Awaken Series.” in this post, vixen of verse Sarah Wells ruminates on using artistic gifts–especially poetry–in church. this piece is pragmatic, encouraging, and an exciting start for all folks interested in mixing it up with faith and art! feel free to share!}

If you are anything like me, you are proud and excited about what the Holy Spirit has revealed to you through poetry.  You’ve set out with an idea, had that idea turned on … Read More »



Into the Wilderness

15th August

{this week’s post comes to us via Jeffrey Overstreet and a Patheos blog post. after reading this post and feeling that it almost perfectly embodied the mission that we have here at Antler, Jeffery graciously gave us permission to use it. i hope that you’ll enjoy, pass it around, meditate on the importance of what it means to be a believer in a world that “God so loved”…}

I recently received an email from a young woman saying that she wanted to read my novels, but that first she needed to know if we believed the same things.

I’m still reeling from that question.

And yet, if I’m honest…

…I remember that way of thinking.

Growing up, I remember choosing which Sunday afternoon football team I’d favor by which one had a known, professing Christian on it. I remember being worried if what I read … Read More »



Throwback!: George Herbert’s “The Dawning”

30th July

{for Antler’s Throwback! Series, seasoned poets will discuss their favorite poems and poets and how those poems have come to shape their poetry, their faith, and their ideas about living and writing. this week, poet Paul Willis–you can read his bio and brilliant poems here–discusses an old mainstay of English and devotional poetry: George Herbert. please take note that–because of an html issue–the poem’s spacing is off; each alternating line should be indented, like this}

 

The Dawning

Awake sad heart, whom sorrow ever drowns;

Take up thine eyes, which feed on earth;

Unfold thy forehead gathered into frowns:

Thy Saviour comes, and with him mirth:

Awake, awake;

And with a thankful heart his comforts take.

But thou dost still lament, and pine, and cry;

And feel his death, but not his victory.

 

Arise sad heart; if thou do not withstand,

Christ’s resurrection thine may be:

Do not by hanging down break from the hand,

Which … Read More »




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