Tag: ministry


writing my way in

13th March

Recently I was asked to visit a senior English class at the school where I teach World Religions.  I was excited to be entering into conversation with students not just as their familiar teacher but as  a ‘real poet.’  But as I was telling students about the writing life, when I was singing the usual song about how hard it is to write, and how I have to drag myself to do it sometimes, a student I knew quite well looked at me half in annoyance and half in genuine curiosity.  He asked, “Then why do you do it?”

My brain sputtered.  No one had asked me that, that directly, in a long time.  I could have gotten dramatic and said because I have no other choice!  It must come from my soul or surely I will perish! Instead I said … Read More »



interview: matt appling

28th February

when you picture someone reading your book, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

I think of several different people reading Life After Art.  The book is primarily aimed at people who don’t already consider themselves “creative.”  Businessmen, soccer moms, teachers, trash men, high school or college grads.  I think creative people will also get a lot out of it too.  In fact, I hope they read it, and then give it to their non-artsy friends.  I hope the book helps release them from some chains, shows them that creativity is something they can take part it, and helps them create the life they are created to live.

 

how do you use your own creative … Read More »



when we were on fire: a review

16th October

{ addie zierman, friend of ANTLER and memoirist, releases her book “when we were on fire” this week! here’s a brief review by micha boyett. if you like what you see here, go ahead and let the world know. then head over to addie’s synchroblog and tell your own story! order the book here… }

 

Addie Zierman’s memoir begins in front of her high school, in tenth grade. Her mom drops her off at the flagpole for “See You At the Pole,” a phenomenon experienced by many of us who grew up evangelical in the nineties. Once a year, Christian teenagers were challenged to meet at the flagpole before school, pray for their fellow classmates, and risk their high school status for the sake of Christ.

Addie approaches the empty flagpole, her violin case dangling in her hand, and stands before it … Read More »



san francisco workshop!

10th September

in SAN FRANCISCO? know someone who is?

come spend the weekend writing, making friends, and seeing things differently!

tell everyone you know!

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/442138



sacramento workshop!

5th September

near SACRAMENTO on september 19 & 20? come out and join the party!



making manifest interviews

12th August

in these interviews, dave harrity fleshes out his vision for his book “making manifest: on faith, creativity, and the kingdom at hand”

making manifest interviews (parts 1 + 2 + 3)



ad pax: the wonder maker

1st August

{ in her next installment, ANTLER blogger amy george invites writers of all skill levels to contemplate and create. feel free to send her the results of your exercise, or post on our page! }

My husband, Calvin, is a star gazer. Literally. He has a huge telescope with an 8-inch mirror. He enjoys looking at the planets and stars and marveling over how amazing they are. He will drag a giant telescope into the middle of nowhere (“to get away from light pollution,” he says) in the middle of the night, while most people are cozy at home. He has always loved the sciences and things with a touch of mystery.

Appreciation for the beauty around us comes and goes. Even though we live in a majestically-created, awe-inspiring world, we can easily lose our sense of wonder at the world, with … Read More »



horror & the holy, part 2

23rd July

In my last article, we began discussing the engagement of Christian art with the horror genre. Horror, I argued, fundamentally functions by a theme of “transgression” which can be employed for faith-minded purposes – not only does horror attack that which is lovely, but it also affirms that there is something lovely to be attacked in the first place.

However, the purpose of Christian living is to “glorify God and enjoy Him forever” – a horror story may affirm His law, but how can it affirm the Creator Himself?

This moves us towards the relationship between the holy and the obscene. Most horror stories clearly get their momentum from the latter, but horror can also serve to make us mindful of the sacred. In The Problem of Pain (1940), C. S. Lewis sets up a fascinating striation of just how humans experience the … Read More »



desiring the kingdom: the musical

26th June

{ in this playful meditation, heather goodman explores liturgy, love, parenting, and purpose—grappling to make sense of the rhythms of a life lived in faith. }

 

James K.A. Smith wrote his book, Desiring the Kingdom: Worship Worldview, and Cultural Formation, for fellow professors, students, and, upon further reflection, for pastors. I am none of the above in the traditional sense.

I read this book as a member of a church plant considering the shape of our worship and discipleship, but I found myself conversing with this book more as a mother and an artist.

Smith argues, in essence, that we need to move beyond knowledge to wisdom and that we do so primarily through worship. In short, this book considers how liturgy—meaning how we worship—forms “a certain kind of people whose hearts and passions and desires are aimed at the kingdom of God” … Read More »



creativity and peacemaking: poetry drone

25th June

i believe this world is a complicated place, that i’m nearly void of answers, and that—as thomas merton says in his famous prayer— “i have no idea where i am going.” (that prayer embodies most every day of my life…). as such, i tend not to speak publicly about issues of which i’m passionate—i’m never quite sure of my motivation, correctness, or even how i might feel about it later. rather than risk embarrassment, i say nothing. or—almost always—say it discretely in my daily writing. writing which no one sees but me. but here, i’d like to take a little stand for something i think has provocative implications for christian creatives. and—as i love such things—it demonstrates the world’s complexity. this project speaks to my deeply held beliefs about creating: the opposite of making art is doing violence.* or, to say it … Read More »




resources for faithful practitioners of creativity and creative practitioners of faith...

crow delivers the goods

Just as meaning in a conversation rises out of an exchange of ideas originating in shared experience, meaning in a poem rises out of...

interview: matthew lippman

{an interview with poet matthew lippman upon the release of his third collection of poetry, AMERICAN CHEW, which won the burnside review book prize in 2013}

when you...

mirrors made of ink

Books are the mirrors of the soul. –Virginia Woolf

In Christian writing, it seems required to inject a “deeper meaning.” Humans were designed to search...