Tag: ministry


creative luxury: beyond maslow

Posted by Sarah Schock in christian living, creativity, ministry, vocation. No Comments

3rd July

A few months ago my husband, our two kids, and I returned from seven years in China, where we served with Food for the Hungry. Soon after landing on U.S. soil, we were given the opportunity to attend a one-week “Debriefing and Renewal” retreat for returning missionaries. The retreat was held at a tucked-away inn in Colorado Springs, surrounded by pines and trails and with a stunning view of Pike’s Peak. There were cozy rooms, fireplaces, big picture windows, hot tubs. It took me most of the week to get over the fact that it was all for us: the beauty of the location, the time to rest, and the chance to share our stories, reflect, and process.

Most precious, though, was that the facilitators were there solely to minister to us. They invited conversation around the themes of paradox—God is … Read More »



the loosened tongue: the contagion of prophecy

22nd May

“Is catching prophecy like catching measles?” William Taber asks this question in his pamphlet “The Prophetic Stream.” The language may be playful, but it raises legitimate questions: What role, if any, does the religious community play in the realization of prophetic gifts? Are prophetic gifts enhanced by being around people who are similarly blessed? Do prophetic gifts appear out of the blue, or are they more prone to surface in certain contexts over others?

While it is clear in scripture that the Spirit can manifest when and where She wills (see John 4 and the story of Cornelius in Acts 10), it is equally clear that the Spirit can transfer from one person to the next. Move to chapter 19 of Acts, and we discover that those meeting in Ephesus are found to be in belief about all the facts about Christ, … Read More »



writing my way in

13th March

Recently I was asked to visit a senior English class at the school where I teach World Religions.  I was excited to be entering into conversation with students not just as their familiar teacher but as  a ‘real poet.’  But as I was telling students about the writing life, when I was singing the usual song about how hard it is to write, and how I have to drag myself to do it sometimes, a student I knew quite well looked at me half in annoyance and half in genuine curiosity.  He asked, “Then why do you do it?”

My brain sputtered.  No one had asked me that, that directly, in a long time.  I could have gotten dramatic and said because I have no other choice!  It must come from my soul or surely I will perish! Instead I said … Read More »



interview: matt appling

28th February

when you picture someone reading your book, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

I think of several different people reading Life After Art.  The book is primarily aimed at people who don’t already consider themselves “creative.”  Businessmen, soccer moms, teachers, trash men, high school or college grads.  I think creative people will also get a lot out of it too.  In fact, I hope they read it, and then give it to their non-artsy friends.  I hope the book helps release them from some chains, shows them that creativity is something they can take part it, and helps them create the life they are created to live.

 

how do you use your own creative … Read More »



when we were on fire: a review

16th October

{ addie zierman, friend of ANTLER and memoirist, releases her book “when we were on fire” this week! here’s a brief review by micha boyett. if you like what you see here, go ahead and let the world know. then head over to addie’s synchroblog and tell your own story! order the book here… }

 

Addie Zierman’s memoir begins in front of her high school, in tenth grade. Her mom drops her off at the flagpole for “See You At the Pole,” a phenomenon experienced by many of us who grew up evangelical in the nineties. Once a year, Christian teenagers were challenged to meet at the flagpole before school, pray for their fellow classmates, and risk their high school status for the sake of Christ.

Addie approaches the empty flagpole, her violin case dangling in her hand, and stands before it … Read More »



san francisco workshop!

10th September

in SAN FRANCISCO? know someone who is?

come spend the weekend writing, making friends, and seeing things differently!

tell everyone you know!

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/442138



sacramento workshop!

5th September

near SACRAMENTO on september 19 & 20? come out and join the party!



making manifest interviews

12th August

in these interviews, dave harrity fleshes out his vision for his book “making manifest: on faith, creativity, and the kingdom at hand”

making manifest interviews (parts 1 + 2 + 3)



ad pax: the wonder maker

1st August

{ in her next installment, ANTLER blogger amy george invites writers of all skill levels to contemplate and create. feel free to send her the results of your exercise, or post on our page! }

My husband, Calvin, is a star gazer. Literally. He has a huge telescope with an 8-inch mirror. He enjoys looking at the planets and stars and marveling over how amazing they are. He will drag a giant telescope into the middle of nowhere (“to get away from light pollution,” he says) in the middle of the night, while most people are cozy at home. He has always loved the sciences and things with a touch of mystery.

Appreciation for the beauty around us comes and goes. Even though we live in a majestically-created, awe-inspiring world, we can easily lose our sense of wonder at the world, with … Read More »



horror & the holy, part 2

23rd July

In my last article, we began discussing the engagement of Christian art with the horror genre. Horror, I argued, fundamentally functions by a theme of “transgression” which can be employed for faith-minded purposes – not only does horror attack that which is lovely, but it also affirms that there is something lovely to be attacked in the first place.

However, the purpose of Christian living is to “glorify God and enjoy Him forever” – a horror story may affirm His law, but how can it affirm the Creator Himself?

This moves us towards the relationship between the holy and the obscene. Most horror stories clearly get their momentum from the latter, but horror can also serve to make us mindful of the sacred. In The Problem of Pain (1940), C. S. Lewis sets up a fascinating striation of just how humans experience the … Read More »




resources for faithful practitioners of creativity and creative practitioners of faith...

interview: david wright

{ in this interview, poet david wright discusses craft, inspiration, and revision }

when you picture someone reading your poetry, how do you see them?...

“walking with kindness” by mark liebenow

What is required of us is to do justice, love kindness,

 and walk humbly with our God. Micah 6:8

 

I imagine Micah...

“a made thing” by heather caliri

For a long time, I simply felt helpless.

My youth pastor in high school was spiritually abusive to many of us, and he sexually abused...