Tag: interview


interview: aaron belz

Posted by Sarah Schock in creativity, interview, poetry, poets, vocation, writing. 1 Comment

24th July

{an interview with poet and essayist aaron belz, who recently released his third collection of poetry, GLITTER BOMB}

when you picture someone reading your poetry, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

I don’t picture anyone reading my poetry. I have no basis for what happens in that mental picture other than seeing people reading things and, hopefully, enjoying them. Whom I write for is the discouraged person. I just want them to know I’m here for them if they need me. I also write to make myself laugh. It’s the old “you crack yourself up” thing. If I’m my own worst critic, am I not also my own best audience? Live readings are a … Read More »



interview: shane mccrae

Posted by Sarah Schock in creativity, interview, poetry, poets, vocation, writing. No Comments

11th July

{an interview with poet shane mccrae, whose newest collection, FORGIVENESS FORGIVENESS, will be published by factory hollow press next month. pre-order it here}

when you picture someone reading your poetry, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

I don’t know that I have an ideal reader—which, I know, isn’t an answer to the question, but is maybe parallel to an answer, maybe a way into answering. I’ve always felt a little disingenuous saying that I write for myself, although I do—the problem, I think, is in the word for. It suggests the giving of a gift. I write because I can’t not write, because I wouldn’t know how to be if I didn’t write, and … Read More »



interview: renee emerson

Posted by Sarah Schock in creativity, interview, poetry, poets, writing. No Comments

12th June

{an interview with pushcart prize-nominated poet renee emerson, whose first book, KEEPING ME STILL, is now available for purchase}

when you picture someone reading your poetry, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

I picture my great-great-great granddaughter coming upon my dusty, well-worn poetry book in a box in the attic. Taking it down and thumbing through it while the babies are napping. Smudging it with greasy fingers because she’s reading while cooking dinner. Reading it as she would a diary or a long letter. I know it is a little romantic for this to be my ideal reader, her hair in a loose ponytail and wearing yesterday’s T-shirt, but she’s there behind every poem … Read More »



interview: micha boyett

Posted by Sarah Schock in creativity, interview, memior/cnf, writing. No Comments

8th May

{an interview with author micha boyett, whose spiritual memoir, FOUND: A STORY OF QUESTIONS, GRACE, AND EVERYDAY PRAYER, was released last month}

when you picture someone reading your book, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

When I began writing Found, I was thinking about other mothers in my stage of life. I was asking, Why is no one writing about the spiritual dryness of motherhood? But what I’ve discovered over the process of writing (and learning how to be a mom at the same time–my oldest son was eighteen months old when I started this book; now he’s almost six) is that the themes of identity and weakness in faith belong to everyone. The intensity of motherhood revealed … Read More »



interview: matthew lippman

Posted by Sarah Schock in creativity, interview, poetry, poets, writing. No Comments

3rd April

{an interview with poet matthew lippman upon the release of his third collection of poetry, AMERICAN CHEW, which won the burnside review book prize in 2013}

when you picture someone reading your poetry, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

I want my poems to be generous creatures, and so the audience in my mind is everyone—high school students, teachers, attorneys, other poets, bus drivers, mechanics. If my mechanic, Tony, picks up my book, gets into one of my poems, and is entertained and moved by it, I’m doing my job. It’s not so much a case of nourishment as it is a case of having fun. By fun I mean this, being moved, in any way, … Read More »



interview: matt appling

28th February

when you picture someone reading your book, how do you see them? what do they think about, wear, and do? or, maybe a better way to say it: who do you write for? and how do you see your writing nourishing others?

I think of several different people reading Life After Art.  The book is primarily aimed at people who don’t already consider themselves “creative.”  Businessmen, soccer moms, teachers, trash men, high school or college grads.  I think creative people will also get a lot out of it too.  In fact, I hope they read it, and then give it to their non-artsy friends.  I hope the book helps release them from some chains, shows them that creativity is something they can take part it, and helps them create the life they are created to live.

 

how do you use your own creative … Read More »



interview: alissa wilkinson

Posted by dave in interview, writing. No Comments

25th September

{ Editor’s update: Since we last spoke with Alissa, she has completed the MFA at Seattle Pacific University, and also has been named Chief Film Critic at Christianity Today Movies, rendering portions of this interview outdated. However—we think you’ll agree—there is still great content here, so we’re happy to run it. }

1. Alissa, thanks for chatting with us. Anyone who knows you knows you are notoriously busy and productive. What’s a typical day look like for you?

Well, my schedule varies wildly based on whether I’m teaching that day, holding office hours, traveling, or working from home, but generally I try to get up early, write for an hour or two, go for a run (I’m training for a half marathon in January), then head in to the office. Once I’m on campus at King’s, I often have a smattering of … Read More »



making manifest interviews

12th August

in these interviews, dave harrity fleshes out his vision for his book “making manifest: on faith, creativity, and the kingdom at hand”

making manifest interviews (parts 1 + 2 + 3)



horror & the holy, part 2

23rd July

In my last article, we began discussing the engagement of Christian art with the horror genre. Horror, I argued, fundamentally functions by a theme of “transgression” which can be employed for faith-minded purposes – not only does horror attack that which is lovely, but it also affirms that there is something lovely to be attacked in the first place.

However, the purpose of Christian living is to “glorify God and enjoy Him forever” – a horror story may affirm His law, but how can it affirm the Creator Himself?

This moves us towards the relationship between the holy and the obscene. Most horror stories clearly get their momentum from the latter, but horror can also serve to make us mindful of the sacred. In The Problem of Pain (1940), C. S. Lewis sets up a fascinating striation of just how humans experience the … Read More »



making manifest round-up #3

14th July

in case you’ve missed the buzz, here’s just a few things being said about “making manifest: on faith, creativity, and the kingdom at hand” (if you haven’t gotten your copy yet, order it today!)

 

reviews…

super positive endorsement from englewood review of books!

 

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posts by bloggers… (and what’s lovely about these posts are that both “writer” and “non-writer” types are using the book!)

kerri baysinger

renee emerson

johnny douglas

kathleen kruger

 

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interviews with harrity…

w/ messiah community and michael lorin (an episcopalian revisiting evangelical roots… ;-) )

 

 

 




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interview: aaron belz

{an interview with poet and essayist aaron belz, who recently released his third collection of poetry, GLITTER BOMB}

when you picture someone reading your poetry,...