Tag: contributors


breaking through: the sacredness of words

27th March

The preparation is done, the centering of mind and heart by prayer, Bible study, or walking through nature and listening.

I sit down at my brown wooden desk in a dark room. The desk lamp lights only the paper. Everything else is back in the shadows. When I begin to write, my hand moves into the light.

The work of our hands is part of creation, because God’s work continues to be done in the world through human hands. Writers put words together and create sentences and stories, bringing the unspoken into the light and giving it form.

In the shadows I wait, listening until I see an image, hear an echo, or feel a presence. Then I wait for words to come that will root this into my time and place.

As words come, I write them down. When they stop, I set … Read More »



where i find myself: seasons

17th February

My previous post launched my ongoing series about faith, writing, and what I keep calling (perhaps not very poetically, ironically enough) “the language of place”—specifically, my place, my native state, my home. California.

Well, I realized I might not have quite as good of a hold on my own idea as one would hope when, after I finished “explaining” my topic to someone recently, he said, “So it’s about slang?”

Nah, dude. Not exactly.

But OK then, what is it about? The truth is, not completely knowing is part of why I write. The act of writing is an act of exploration, as is (in my experience) the act of having faith. Not to mention the act of living day to day on the shaky ground and in the smog-laced atmosphere of the Golden State.

 

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Commenting on my last post, in which I … Read More »



tracking the walking poets

18th November

So we are grasped by what we cannot grasp;
it has inner light, even from a distance—
and changes us, even if we do not reach it…

—Rilke, “A Walk”

 

 I cannot be the only child who was first exposed to “devotional poetry” through the ever-famous work “Footprints in the Sand”. I saw it mostly on the walls of friends or neighbors—in embroidered prints with sand and water and sky sewn in around the verses to set the scene of a dreamed of beach.

While I was never as enamored of it as everyone else seemed to be, I did accept its sentiment of spiritual comfort, then. The allegory of a walk made sense to a child raised on Bible stories and fairy tales of adventurous wanderings and who had walked barefoot by the water on many summer holidays. And there … Read More »



when we were on fire: a review

16th October

{ addie zierman, friend of ANTLER and memoirist, releases her book “when we were on fire” this week! here’s a brief review by micha boyett. if you like what you see here, go ahead and let the world know. then head over to addie’s synchroblog and tell your own story! order the book here… }

 

Addie Zierman’s memoir begins in front of her high school, in tenth grade. Her mom drops her off at the flagpole for “See You At the Pole,” a phenomenon experienced by many of us who grew up evangelical in the nineties. Once a year, Christian teenagers were challenged to meet at the flagpole before school, pray for their fellow classmates, and risk their high school status for the sake of Christ.

Addie approaches the empty flagpole, her violin case dangling in her hand, and stands before it … Read More »



bleeding passions

27th August

[ in this post, dirk devries discusses his feelings about being pulled between two muses—poetry and photography. ]

I live with divided passion. I am in love with both word and image. I am both poet and photographer.

It isn’t always an easy relationship. I question my ability to do justice to either. Would I be an outstanding photographer if I channeled all my creative energy toward image? Would my poetry take off if the time spent in photo-making were reserved for writing? Both require constant practice as well as attentive soul-time.

The truth is, I will likely never advance as far as I might with either as long as I continue to devote time to both. But I am okay with this; it’s a compromise I accept, because I find, in the merging of the two, that I create something uniquely … Read More »



horror & the holy, part 2

23rd July

In my last article, we began discussing the engagement of Christian art with the horror genre. Horror, I argued, fundamentally functions by a theme of “transgression” which can be employed for faith-minded purposes – not only does horror attack that which is lovely, but it also affirms that there is something lovely to be attacked in the first place.

However, the purpose of Christian living is to “glorify God and enjoy Him forever” – a horror story may affirm His law, but how can it affirm the Creator Himself?

This moves us towards the relationship between the holy and the obscene. Most horror stories clearly get their momentum from the latter, but horror can also serve to make us mindful of the sacred. In The Problem of Pain (1940), C. S. Lewis sets up a fascinating striation of just how humans experience the … Read More »



making manifest round-up #3

14th July

in case you’ve missed the buzz, here’s just a few things being said about “making manifest: on faith, creativity, and the kingdom at hand” (if you haven’t gotten your copy yet, order it today!)

 

reviews…

super positive endorsement from englewood review of books!

 

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posts by bloggers… (and what’s lovely about these posts are that both “writer” and “non-writer” types are using the book!)

kerri baysinger

renee emerson

johnny douglas

kathleen kruger

 

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interviews with harrity…

w/ messiah community and michael lorin (an episcopalian revisiting evangelical roots… ;-) )

 

 

 



desiring the kingdom: the musical

26th June

{ in this playful meditation, heather goodman explores liturgy, love, parenting, and purpose—grappling to make sense of the rhythms of a life lived in faith. }

 

James K.A. Smith wrote his book, Desiring the Kingdom: Worship Worldview, and Cultural Formation, for fellow professors, students, and, upon further reflection, for pastors. I am none of the above in the traditional sense.

I read this book as a member of a church plant considering the shape of our worship and discipleship, but I found myself conversing with this book more as a mother and an artist.

Smith argues, in essence, that we need to move beyond knowledge to wisdom and that we do so primarily through worship. In short, this book considers how liturgy—meaning how we worship—forms “a certain kind of people whose hearts and passions and desires are aimed at the kingdom of God” … Read More »



Where I Find Myself: The Voice of My Native State

19th March

Last spring, I wrote a piece for this website on the poetry of Maurice Manning, whose work reflects and draws on the rich language, stories and landscape of his native Kentucky.

One of the things I learned from writing that reflection is that place itself is a kind of language. And like any language, it informs our view of the world and gives shape to our thoughts as we try to make sense of the world around us.

I believe that the place we are from is in our blood, whether we like it or not. I believe that the land gets under our skin. And I know that, for all its faults, for all its shallowness and brokenness and glitter that isn’t gold, California is under mine.
Hopeless dreams, a rootless restlessness, and heartbreaking proximity to a neverending sea are … Read More »



A Worker’s Prayer: On the Meaning of Work

5th March

It’s been five months since I quit teaching.  For three months I worked forty hours at Starbucks and read a lot: Hunger Games, The Lord of the Rings,  Psalms, Surprised by Joy, Letters to a Young Poet.  It’s been almost two months since I started work at a call center; forty hours there, twenty hours at Starbucks.  I had hoped to work two jobs through Christmas, but when I got home one day and couldn’t stop crying, I gave my two-weeks at Starbucks.  So now both familiar jobs, teaching and Starbucks, the ones that supported me in grad school, France, and when I returned to Louisville, are gone.

The reasons I’ve left these jobs are money and writing.  I can’t complain about money, really.  I have enough for rent and small luxuries, but not enough to save, travel, or buy my … Read More »




resources for faithful practitioners of creativity and creative practitioners of faith...

a made thing

For a long time, I simply felt helpless.

My youth pastor in high school was spiritually abusive to many of us, and he sexually abused...

the devil you know: rough drafts

Poor revision, unfairly maligned due to a quirk of human nature! We beasts prefer prowling on familiar territory, rooting up the same soil with...

interview: aaron belz

{an interview with poet and essayist aaron belz, who recently released his third collection of poetry, GLITTER BOMB}

when you picture someone reading your poetry,...